We Just Created an Artificial Synapse That Can Learn Autonomously

A team of researchers has developed artificial synapses that are capable of learning autonomously and can improve how fast artificial neural networks learn.

Source: We Just Created an Artificial Synapse That Can Learn Autonomously

What if an A.I. could learn as fast as we can, or even faster? Soon we may be able to answer that question because researchers at the National Center for Scientific Research (CNRS), the University of Bordeaux and Evry have developed an artificial synapse that does for a neural network what our synapses do for our brain.
Not only should neural networks be able to learn as fast as we can, they should also be able to learn autonomously which is a great step forward in the development of true A.I.

Without privacy, you lose your ability to have an identity of your own

I believe that privacy is something that humans need. Being able to do things and to speak about things without being watched or recorded is essential to growth and identity formation. How do you know who you are or what your values are if you are not free to explore those?

Without privacy, we are unable to test the waters in our formative teenage years, we’re unable to tell things in confidence, and therefore to be ourselves.

Source: Without privacy, you lose your ability to have an identity of your own

15 Answers to Creationist Nonsense

The linked article by John Rennie in Scientific American was originally published in 2002 but it hasn’t lost any of its actuality nor has it been refuted by creationists. Creationist arguments also haven’t changed significantly since then, demonstrating how they are simply unable to formulate an opposing theory to evolution.  I’ve also written some answers to creationists nonsense earlier on this blog and have also explored if creationism is plausible.

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Near-perfect wings from dinosaur times discovered in amber | The Verge

A pair of wings found encased in amber suggest that the plumage of modern birds has remained almost unchanged from some of their dinosaur-era ancestors, according to scientists. In a new study published in the Nature Communications journal this week, researchers say that the wings have very similar structures, coloring, and feather layouts as the wings of modern birds, despite the fact they likely belonged to 100-million-year-old avialans called enantiornithes.

http://www.theverge.com/2016/6/29/12057434/avian-dinosaur-wings-discovered-in-amber

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Prehistoric asteroid wiped out nearly all mammals as well as dinosaurs, research suggests

I’ve always been fascinated by dinosaurs, ever since I was a young boy. While they take centre stage in the extinction event at the end of the Cretaceous, 65 million years ago, recent research by scientists from the University of Bath reveals that the impact of the asteroid that struck near the Yucatan peninsula was more severe as was previously assumed.

Nearly every species of mammal was eradicated by the prehistoric asteroid which wiped out the dinosaurs, research suggests. Around 93% of mammal species were made extinct by the strike, which took place in the Cretaceous period, more than 66 million years ago. Examination of fossil records by scientists from the University of Bath determined that the asteroid’s impact had been much more severe than previously thought.

Source: Prehistoric asteroid wiped out nearly all mammals as well as dinosaurs, research suggests

Building blocks of life’s first self-replicator recreated in lab | New Scientist

New Scientist has an article announcing that a team of the Ludwig Maximilian University in Munich has found a plausible way to generate the two purine nucleosides, adenosine and guanosine – A and G in the genetic code. This is a big step to explaining how RNA may have formed spontaneously on the primordial Earth.

RNA molecules are thought to be some of the earliest self-replicators that led to life. Now their building blocks have been made to self-assemble in a lab

Source: Building blocks of life’s first self-replicator recreated in lab | New Scientist